Issues

Apr 132017
 

Dear Readers,

We have reached our baker’s dozen. It is a delight to bring to you the 13th issue of JUnQ – the baking was a tad too long. We take an in-depth look into Science and Art – the central theme of this issue. More so, on how one complements the other, even though from afar they may look like nothing alike. We have had engrossing discussions with Artists, who mix their craft with scientific foundations, and Scientists, who dabble in the creative outlets that Arts provides. Did you know that dancing could win us the battle against dementia or that dead inanimate objects can be breathed new life into through science….all this and more you can find between the covers. And we (the editorial team at JUnQ) have also harnessed our creativity in coming out with the JUnQ Photo Contest, where you can showcase your talent to identify the aesthetic appeal of science. Even though an issue like this doesn’t have the negative or null result-oriented articles we so wish to highlight, still it serves as an important vehicle to appreciate the other mediums of seeking knowledge, than the analytical. To whet your appetite, we have titivating essays about the wonderful history of Art and Science and not to forget, for the ever curious, Questions of the Week pages.

We understand and appreciate your patience. We hope you feel excited about our newest issue of JUnQ!

— Soham Roy on behalf of the editorial board

Download JUnQ Volume 7 Issue 1

Jul 312016
 

Christina Pahl,a Igor Cavalcanti da Silveira,b Armando Dias Duarte,c Arleson Kennedi Franca dos Santosb

aTechnische Universitaet Ilmenau, Ilmenau, State of Thuringia, Germany
bFederal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Pernambuco, Caruaru, Brazil
cFederal University of Pernambuco, Caruaru, Brazil

Received 14.03.2016, accepted 25.04.2016, published 26.07.2016

JUnQ, 6, 2, 1–6, 2016

The continuous growth in human population implicates an increasing need for water. This demand encloses especially industrial structures. The federal state Pernambuco is one of the leading textile producers in Brazil. Although, the dry sub-humid state represents less than 5% of its national population, it covers approximately 20% of nationally manufactured jeans. Its high water consumption exacerbates the environmental situation during the actual strong drought which continues to impact the entire
northern part of the South American continent. One main factor is the emission of chemically contaminated effluents from industrial laundries to Ipojuca river, being the third most contaminated river in Brazil. In this study, we analyse impact factors contributing to anthropogenic environmental damage in one of Pernambuco’s main jeans producing region, Caruaru, and provide a sustainable solution towards waste water treatment. The methodology encloses a comparison of the exemplary sewage water management in the city Hof, Germany. Our results enclose parameters responsible for the damage to the fragile environment in Pernambuco and the Ipojuca River as well as a model for a sustainable infrastructure of the intended expansion of the industrial park in Caruaru.

Download the article here: Sustainable Processing

Jul 312016
 

Alexander F. G. Goldberg,a Klaus Roth,b,1 CJ Chemjobberc

a Department of Organic Chemistry, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel
b Institut fuer Organische Chemie und Biochemie, Freie Universitaet Berlin
c 3170 Road 40 1/2, Shell, WY 82441, USA

Adapted and translated with permission from A. F. G. Goldberg, K. Roth, CJ Chemjobber, Chem. unserer Zeit 2016, 50, 144–145.
© 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co KGaA, Weinheim.

JUnQ, 6, 2, 8–9, 2016

Household products from the food and cosmetics industry are advertized as “chemical free” in a nearly inflationary way. This declaration is mostly incorrect and it suggests that the products are produced from natural products, are extremely healthy, or completely free of artificial ingredients. We have investigated these labels for a broad variety of such products, including herbal supplements, processed food and beverages, next to cosmetic products and cleaning agents. As a result we were able to compile a complete list of all “chemical free” domestic products.

Download the article here: Chemical Free Household Products

Jul 302016
 

Dr. Gerta Ruecker, a mathematician by training, works as a biostatistician at the Medical Center – University of Freiburg, Germany. Her special area is meta-analysis, and she is associated with Cochrane Germany. She has written a large
number of research papers on statistical methods, and co-authored a number of Cochrane reviews. Additionally, she is engaged in teaching meta-analysis methods and is one of the authors of a book ‘Use R for meta-analysis’.

Find the Interview here: Interview with Dr. Gerta Ruecker

Jul 302016
 

PD Dr. Nicolai Bissantz is a mathematician at the Ruhr University Bochum, Germany. His research fields are applied and mathematical statistics, in particular with applications in science and engineering. Amongst these fields are applications of statistical inverse problems in astronomy and in image reconstruction. Such problems arise e.g., in the recovery of images from fluorescence microscopy imaging and in medical imaging devices such as PET (positron emission tomography).

Find the Interview here: Interview with PD Dr. Nicolai Bissantz

Jul 302016
 

Dr. Rainer Wanke is a physicist working in the field of experimental particle physics at the University of Mainz, Germany. He is working on the NA62 experiment at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, which measures ultra-rare K-meson decays. This involves both, particle detector development and the analysis of data taken with those particle detectors. He furthermore teaches statistics for undergraduate students in Mainz.

Find the Interview here: Interview with Dr. Rainer Wanke

Jul 282016
 

Theresa Weidner

JUnQ, 6, 2, XXVII–XXVIII, 2016

A Commentary on “Most People are not WEIRD” by Joseph Henrich et al., Nature (2010)

Prof. Joseph Henrich is an anthropologist at the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University, Cambridge, USA. His focus is on evolutionary approaches to psychology, decision-making and culture. Together with his colleagues Stephen J. Heine and Ara Norenzayan at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, CA, he was the first to point out that, in economics, psychology and cognitive science, conclusions are generally drawn from study participants with the same background: Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich and Democratic (WEIRD). In addition, primarily students form the majority of test subjects. Still, researchers – often unintentionally – claim that their findings apply to everybody.

Read the full article here: The Use of the Term “People” in Research

Jul 282016
 

Kai Litzius

JUnQ, 6, 2, XXV–XXVI, 2016

Open access sharing contributes nowadays a major part to the publication process in many different scientific disciplines. One could think it is an invention of modern time, however, the idea to make data and literature widely available is quite old: Libraries.

Read the full article here: A Quick Word on Open Access Sharing

Jul 282016
 

Dear Reader,

Even though I was a member of this editorial board for almost five years, I never wrote the editorial of an issue. Since I finished my university education and will soon start my industrial career, forcing me to leave JUnQ, it is my pleasure to write it for the current issue.

The feature topic this time deals with a problem, which has been in the press a lot lately: Misuse of Statistics.

Read the whole Editorial Note by Andreas Neidlinger.

Jul 252016
 

JC

Dear Readers,

We are delighted to bring to you the 12th issue of JUnQ. This time round, the central theme deals with Statistics in Science and what it entails and how can it be misused. We held insightful interviews with few of the best experts in Statistics and we present their views about the current era where mis-interpretations of data abound. It is heartening to see that the publication of negative or null results still is important for many in science. We have an article on Pretreatment of Steel and Zinc surfaces that highlights such details. Also in the days ahead, open access will be the norm and we present an excellent commentary on it.

We hope you feel excited about our newest issue of JUnQ!

— Soham Roy on behalf of the editorial board

Download JUnQ Volume 6 Issue 2